Finding Leaders


Numerous business journals report that a majority of Boston employers are finding it difficult to find strategic thinkers. They also report that it’s just as difficult to find candidates who can lead and motivate.

Isn’t it ironic that in an area with one of the most highly educated workforces in the country, our employers cannot find leaders who possess two of the most important leadership skills? There’s no doubt that our people are among the best and the brightest professionally and technically. But we also know that those who are the most technically or professionally proficient don’t necessarily make the best managers and leaders. They didn’t become the best in their field without an investment in developing skills and knowledge so why do we think they’ll figure out leadership on their own. These reports should sound the alarm bell for all us about the importance of investing in effective leadership development. It is a key lever for moving us from recession to recovery.

From my perspective, three important characteristics of effective management and leadership development are:

    • It’s aligned to the business strategy. How can we develop leaders who are thinking strategically — that is, exhibiting the ability to create strategies, plans, and priorities consistent with the mission and competitive strategy of the organization — if we are developing skills and competencies that are not aligned with the business strategy?
    • It allows them to work on real world issues that are pertinent to their daily activities. Development, whether in the classroom or in the field, should provide tools and frameworks that support actions on the job. I was recently facilitating a session on leading through influence, in which plans are created for making a proposal. One of the leaders in the program commented, “Who knew we would create real deliverables from a training program.”
    • It creates a network for continued development. The power of peer relationships and the learning that occurs from it is one of the most powerful development tools I’ve found. By creating peer relationships focused on sharing ideas and learning among leaders, a sustainable system is created to support continuous, self-directed learning.

Research has also shown that Boston-based employees reported they want their employer to help them further develop their skills which is a key engagement factor. What better win-win can you create than investing in development that will move the business forward and will support further employee engagement?

I’m sure these findings aren’t that different from other parts of the country. This research should spur all of us to take a deeper look at what we expect from managers and leaders and how we invest to support the successful execution of those expectations.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *